As per reports, Summer Wells’ parents appeared on Dr. Phil earlier in the week amid the disappearance of the 5-year-old.

However, the interview did not end well as Summer’s mother, Candus, broke into tears after being questioned about organized crime in their area.

More specifically, the question focused on Tennessee’s Cornbread Mafia. We’re breaking down everything that we know about the organized crime ring.

Parents of Summer Wells appear on Dr. Phil

The Sun reports that during an episode of Dr. Phil, 5-year-old Summer Wells’ parents were interviewed by behavior analysts and body language experts Scott Rouse and Greg Hartley.

Reportedly, Candus Wells broke down in tears when asked about organized crime in their area, and later said: “Get these wires off of me.”

To be more specific, Rouse and Hartley had asked about Tennessee’s Cornbread Mafia, going on to explain: “She insulates when she starts crying so we can’t get to her. In other words, psychologically we can’t speak to her and we see the emotion as soon as I say cornbread mafia.”

Photo by Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

What is the Cornbread Mafia?

Reportedly, the ‘Cornbread Mafia’ is a “colloquialism” referring to a grass-roots crime ring in Tennessee.

As we know, Summer Moon-Utah Wells went missing from her home in Hawkins County’s Beach Creek Community, Tennessee, and the ‘Cornbread Mafia’ operate in Tennessee.

When questioned about the “colloquialism”, Don, Wells’ father, admitted that he had heard of gang activity in their neighborhood, The Sun reports.

Summer Wells case explained

5-year-old Summer Wells went missing on June 15th 2021 from her family home in Tennessee.

At the time, her family disclosed that she had been in the front yard planting flowers with her mother and grandmother before going inside to play with toys. That would be the last time Summer Wells was seen.

The investigation is ongoing.

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