There are wild theories going on the internet about a ‘zombie apocalypse’ on February 21st, 2021 – here’s what started the trend.

The past year has been a tumultuous one for the whole world which started with bushfires across Australia, a global pandemic and international protests about the Black Lives movement.

As we enter the new year, many countries are still under national lockdowns and strict restrictions because of the ongoing Covid-19 situation.

In a world where we can’t make plans right now, some social media users have been reading about wild predictions about 2021 and a supposed ‘zombie apocalypse’.

Photo by Simon Wijers on Unsplash

‘Zombie apocalypse’ on February 21st, 2021 explained

The eerie prediction about a supposed ‘zombie apocalypse’ has been shared by many social media users who claim that zombies are coming on February 21st, 2021.

It appears that the trend started after people started reading about the writings of the French philosopher Nostradamus.

He allegedly made a number of predictions in his book Les Prophéties in 1555 in which he wrote:

“Few young people: half−dead to give a start. Dead through spite, he will cause the others to shine.

“Fathers and mothers dead of infinite sorrows, Women in mourning, the pestilent she−monster: The Great One to be no more, all the world to end.”

Nostradamus allegedly predicted the Covid-19 outbreak in 2020 but there is no actual evidence to support that.

Theories like these have been circulating on the internet for a long time. The Mayans predicted that the world would end on June 21st, 2012 (later changed to December 21st, 2012) which didn’t happen.

Who was Nostradamus and were any of his alleged predictions true?

Nostradamus was a French astrologer and physician. He was born in Saint Rémy de Provence in December 1503.

Some of his claims have come true such as the Great Fire of London in 1666, 100 years before it actually happened.

But historians and experts have warned that some of Nostradamus’ apocalyptic predictions such as plagues were very common during his time.

Stephane Gerson, Professor of French, French Studies, and History at New York University told Reuters:

“One should keep in mind that plagues were recurrent in 16th-century Europe, during his lifetime. They were one of the travails about which he wrote (indeed, there are at least 35 references to plagues in his ‘Prophecies’).”

People react on Twitter

A lot of social media users have taken to Twitter to share their reactions to the apocalyptic theories going on the internet.

Check out a selection of tweets down below.

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