This weekend was supposed to be Glastonbury Festival 2020, one of the biggest festivals in the calendar. And it’s particularly famous for one strange detail – the super fence.

Festival-goers from all over the world were excited to see Kenrick Lamar, Taylor Swift, Paul McCartney and Diana Ross, to name just a few of the huge acts that would have been playing.

As the festival has unfortunately had to be cancelled, many people have been reminiscing back to old Glastonbury festivals, watching videos and finding out more information about its history to get their Glastonbury fix.

One turn of events that has been rediscovered is the huge numbers of people that broke into the festival throughout the 90s. Fence jumping was a common occurrence as people wanted to get in on the action without actually paying for a ticket, and it was surprisingly easy to do.

That is until the super fence was built, which changed everything.

Photo by Andrew Hasson/Getty Images

What is Glastonbury Festival?

Glastonbury Festival is a UK based festival of music, dance, comedy, theatre, circus and other arts.

The five-day festival takes place in Pilton, Somerset and first started in the 1970s as Pilton Festival.

Since then, it has grown into one of the biggest festivals in the world, with some huge acts taking to its stages from Coldplay to Oasis, Van Morrison, David Bowie, Dolly Parton and many many more.

What is the Glastonbury super fence?

If you’ve been online, you may have seen people talking about the Glastonbury super fence, and perhaps you’re wondering what is is.

Well, in 2002 Glastonbury Festival set up its famous million pound ‘super fence’.

It’s not just any normal fence, it is 4 metres high and 8km long, surrounding the whole festival site. The super fence an extremely important part of the festival’s safety and security.

Why did Glastonbury set up the super fence?

In 1994, Glastonbury Festival was first televised by Channel 4, showing people all over the nation how good the music festival was and making many people want to attend it for themselves.

Then just a year later in 1995, 80,000 people bought tickets, and it is estimated that the same number of people broke into the Glastonbury Festival site, doubling the number of people on site.

Five years later in the year 2000, a similar thing happened again, with security guards struggling to patrol the 11 mile fence and up to 30,000 people breaking into the festival without an £87 ticket.

According to The Guardian: “Glastonbury host Michael Eavis yesterday pledged to throw a ring of steel around next year’s festival after record numbers sneaked in without paying.”

And as a result, the festival boss built his infamous ‘super fence’ in 2002 to stop anyone from sneaking through.

In other news, Glastonbury experience 2020: Top 7 performances to watch on BBC iPlayer