Where was the Hovis advert filmed? The boy on the bike is back!

Hovis - "Boy on the Bike" advert dir. Ridley Scott

It's absolutely iconic, but where was the Hovis advert filmed?

Where was the Hovis advert filmed? It's a timely question, considering that the much-celebrated advert finally returned to screens on Monday, June 3rd, 2019. 

The cherished British company - which produces bread and flour - has long been considered a national treasure. It's an important symbol to many and maintains a strong household name dating back to 1886; the brand was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire. 

As far as adverts go, this 1973 gem is one of the very best. It features a young boy pushing his bike up a hill to deliver the last loaf of the day. The voice-over, warm and comforting, informs us that the task "...was like taking bread to the top of the world." However, with the help of Hovis, the journey up can be as easy as coming down. 

Poster concerning ration coupons, 18 July 1946. We shall be pleased to accept your coupons for bread, cakes and confectionary. Thank you'. It is displayed next to a Hovis advertisement on...Poster concerning ration coupons, 18 July 1946. We shall be pleased to accept your coupons for bread, cakes and confectionary. Thank you'. It is displayed next to a Hovis advertisement on...

Who made it?

As reported by Daily Echo, the advert was dubbed the UK's "most iconic" recently, as concluded by a survey carried out by a research firm, Kantar. 

New World Symphony by Dvorak compliments the images, but it's the direction which makes the advert so perfect. Funnily enough, it launched the career of none other than Ridley Scott

He has directed such acclaimed feature films as Alien, Blade Runner, Gladiator and more. 

Where was it filmed?

The iconic sequence was filmed on Gold Hill, situated in Shaftesbury in Dorset, England. 

Since then, the location has almost taken on a mythical status, thanks to the dreamlike imagery captured in the advert.

Although it has now been remastered with the aid of the British Film Institute (BFI), it still remains beautifully nostalgic for so many.  

 

Why has it aged so well?

As mentioned, it's just such a nostalgic snippet of filmmaking; iconic in every sense. 

However, it's the themes at the work's centre - community, perseverance - that still resonate with modern audiences. The message it conveys is timeless, and it's terrific to see it back on screens, welcomed by a new generation. 

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