Days Gone should’ve been delayed for the PlayStation 5

Days Gone Deacon And Boozer

Bend Studio's Days Gone would've benefited from being delayed and released as a PlayStation 5 launch title.

Days Gone is the PlayStation 4’s newest exclusive, and – although it’s not a revolutionary masterpiece on par with The Last Of Us and God Of War – it’s a solid foundation for the series’ and Bend Studio like Drake’s Fortune was for Uncharted and Naughty Dog. A lot of the reviews haven’t been kind to the Sons Of Anarchy x World War Z crossover, and it’s likely the reception would have been better had it been delayed and released for the PlayStation 5.

Sony has shared some details about the PlayStation 5 in an exclusive interview with WIRED. According to Sony’s Mark Cerny, the company’s next-gen console will be backwards compatible with the PlayStation 4, and it’ll kill loading screens as long as 15-seconds.

This declaration was backed up by a Sony spokesman who has said that the PlayStation 5’s goal “is to make loading screens a thing of the past, enabling creators to build new and unique gameplay experiences” (via the June 2019 issue of Official PlayStation Magazine - spotted by Wccftech).

And this is why Days Gone should have been delayed for the PlayStation 5.

Days Gone should’ve been delayed for the PlayStation 5

Days Gone 3

In its current state, Days Gone being a PlayStation 5 launch title wouldn’t have fixed its sparse open-world, lack of mission variety, and slow storytelling, but it would have helped Bend Studio iron out the kinks to provide a much smoother and immersive experience.

Forgetting the array of bugs and glitches, one of the biggest problems with Days Gone is that there are a dozen loading screens. Unlike other PlayStation 4 exclusives that provide a smooth transition from cut-scenes to gameplay, the transitions in Days Gone are clunky and noticeable.

The game takes an age to load when you first turn it on, and then there’s an endless amount of fade to black loading screen cuts as the game moves from cut-scenes to gameplay. And this completely kills the flow and immersion.

With some missions being nothing more than one-minute cut-scenes, the number of loading screens does become aggravating. If Days Gone was on the PlayStation 5 and this issue was avoided, then the transitions from storytelling to gameplay would have been seamless rather than immersion breaking and frustrating.

As a PlayStation 5 launch title, Bend Studio would have also been given another year to iron out the glitches and bugs, and to trim some of the unnecessary fat. There’s a lot of meat to Days Gone, and some of the game’s weight should have been cut to provide a faster and constantly interesting experience without any filler and the open-world genre’s worst tropes.

With the PlayStation 5 being backwards compatible with the PlayStation 4, Days Gone will definitely be playable on Sony’s next-gen console. If what they say about its SSD killing loading screens is true, then Bend Studio’s biggest project to date will benefit greatly from the move to next-gen. Because of this, I would suggest that sceptics of Days Gone wait until the PlayStation 5 to witness its shenanigans so they enjoy the best and most immersive experience possible.

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