Fierce Twitter debate ensues over whether Jaguar Land Rover job losses are Brexit related

Signage and Land Rover Range Rover cars are seen at a Land Rover dealership in Wakefield, northern England, on Janaury 10, 2019. - British carmaker Jaguar Land Rover is set to announce up...

The news that Jaguar Land Rover is cutting 4,500 jobs has sparked debate among Twitter users, some of who are blaming Brexit.

The front of a Land Rover Range Rover car is seen at a Land Rover dealership in Wakefield, northern England, on Janaury 10, 2019. - British carmaker Jaguar Land Rover is set to announce up...The front of a Land Rover Range Rover car is seen at a Land Rover dealership in Wakefield, northern England, on Janaury 10, 2019. - British carmaker Jaguar Land Rover is set to announce up...

The news that Jaguar Land Rover are slashing 4,500 jobs has debate on Twitter, with many users blaming Brexit on the company's decision to wield the axe.

These cuts come on top of 1,500 redundancies the organisation made last year. The BBC reports that most of the job losses will be in the management sector, with many office-based roles going.

A slump in diesel cars and turbulent sales in China have presented JLR with many challenges, but they have invested millions planning for Brexit in case of tariffs.

LBC presenter James O'Brien mocked claims from Brexiteers that the company's decision to relocate to Slovakia had nothing to do with Britain's EU exit:

The Liberal Democrats were also quick to seize on the news to push for a 'People's Vote' on Britain's final deal with the EU:

The Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Rebecca Long-Bailey, blamed the Government for the job losses for causing months of uncertainty: 

But Patrick O'Flynn, a Social Democratic Party MEP for the East of England and former UKIP member, responded by blaming JLR's decision on producing diesel cars for their job losses: 

Many Twitter users supported O'Flynn and agreed that JLR's decision cannot be blamed on Brexit: 

JLR, which is owned by Indian firm Tata, made a £90 million loss in the three months leading up to September 30th. In 2017, the company made a £385 million profit. 

The firm announced that they are investing further in electrification by building electric drive units in Wolverhampton. A new battery assembly centre is to be built in Birmingham