Battlefield V: EA Dice Is Responsible For Its Death

Battlefield V 1

Rather than ‘uneducated’ gamers and sexists, it’s EA and DICE who have Battlefield V’s blood on their hands.

EA Dice have finished Battlefield V’s Overture patch after a 24-hour delay. The free update includes new multiplayer and single-player content including Final War Story: The Last Tiger, Vehicle-focused map: Panzerstorm, and the option to actually be able to customise your tanks. Yet this is all relatively pointless as the once beloved series’ latest instalment is a rotten corpse that was put into the ground by its developers and EA.

Having only just been released on November 20, it’s frankly depressing how quickly Battlefield V has been confirmed dead. A month before its release the pre-order figures were 85% behind Call Of Duty: Black Ops 4, and despite EA pleading with fans by pretending they would improve the title’s authenticity, its sales still ended up being 63% below its predecessor, Battlefield 1.

Yet, despite all this, EA Dice still recently held a launch party in Stockholm, Sweden to celebrate their financial and critical failure. With the room presumably full of phony smiles, suited dolts and champagne for a job that wasn’t well done, a graphic was projected onto a large screen openly mocking their once devoted fanbase:

Some of the comments shown were, “What the f*ck was the developers thinking!”, “Feminism ruins everything, feminazies are trying to rewrite history!”, “Genderfield 5”, and “White men! White men! White men!”. While these comments are distressing and inexcusable, the developers continuing to bash their most toxic detractors proves that they remain oblivious to the true cause of Battlefield V’s demise.

The controversy surrounding feminism, feminazis and women in video games started after EA Dice announced that Battlefield V would take place in World War II, only to then reveal in an over-the-top CG trailer that the game would be a ‘fun’ and ‘diverse’ romp instead of a faithful representation. This resulted in the trending hashtag #Notmybattlefield, where the series’ community vented their grievances about having to play as a female British soldier with a prosthetic arm in a battleground rife with historical inaccuracies that would make even Hollywood weep.

Rather than trying to calm the community down by rationally explaining why they opted for this divisive direction, EA Dice’s then Chief-Design-Officer, Patrick Söderlund, insulted the heated fanbase’s intelligence, tried to emotionally blackmail the media into sympathy by saying his daughter didn’t understand the controversy, and then firmly hammered the nails into the instalment’s soon-to-be-occupied coffin by challenging players to not buy it (which was especially stupid considering Call Of Duty and Red Dead Redemption 2 was the competition).

Söderlund's comments and ‘defence’ of the game’s direction killed EA Dice’s chances of ever getting the community back on their side, but it’s far from being the only reason fans have remained true to their word about turning their backs on the battlefield. Not only is the game historically inaccurate, its maps are boring, it’s lacking content, and it’s an incomplete chore that was released as a fully priced product.

Gamers are sick of buying titles that are incomplete, as evident by the cataclysmic reception to and atrocious sales for Bethesda’s empty and depressing bore, Fallout 76. Being able to customise tanks should have been in Battlefield V at launch, and there’s no sound excuse for why the rest of the ‘free’ content wasn’t, either. Even the game’s Fortnite-esque battle royale mode, the one that was announced at E3 to a resounding flurry of groans, isn’t in the game as EA Dice delayed it for 5 months after launch.

The #Notmybattlefield community undoubtedly had some sexist members among its party, but they are not culpable for Battlefield V’s demise and the franchise’s grim future. Players are not returning to EA Dice’s version of World War II due to the game being a critical failure for its incomplete status, lacklustre maps, bizarre design choices, and lacklustre content. EA Dice can continue to mock their detractors all they want by pretending to be social activists rather than cash grabbing predators, but the sad truth for them is that gamers purchased and are playing titles like Red Dead Redemption 2, Call Of Duty: Black Ops 4 and Spyro: Reignited Trilogy because they are fundamentally superior experiences. #NobodysBattlefield. 

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