Everton appointing Allardyce confirms criticisms of Burnley boss Dyche

Sean Dyche, Manager of Burnley looks on during the Premier League match between AFC Bournemouth and Burnley at Vitality Stadium on November 29, 2017 in Bournemouth, England.

Burnley boss Sean Dyche unhappy about a lack of opportunities for young British managers - Everton appointing Sam Allardyce shows where the problem lies.

Sean Dyche, Manager of Burnley looks on during the Premier League match between AFC Bournemouth and Burnley at Vitality Stadium on November 29, 2017 in Bournemouth, England.Sean Dyche, manager of Burnley, looks on during the Premier League match against AFC Bournemouth.

Sean Dyche says that young British managers are finding it increasingly difficult to get opportunities in the Premier League because of the preferential treatment of foreign coaches and experienced figures.

The Burnley boss was speaking ahead of the Clarets' 2-1 triumph against Bournemouth - a side also managed by a young British coach in Eddie Howe - about why people like him don't get given the chances others enjoy.

Eddie Howe the head coachBournemouth head coach Eddie Howe.

"It will be really tough, development wise, for young managers and coaches, if the modern thinking of European and worldwide coaches continues into the game," Dyche told the Lancashire Telegraph.

"There's a lot now in the Premier League and, while I don't know the current stats on it, it looks like there's more foreign coaches going into the Championship. Everyone wants to be here - a lot of managers, coaches and players - but is that good for British managers coming through? It's obviously not ideal.

"The managers who get into the Premier League are under pressure to stay in there. It's like anything in life, you often go for anything that you deem to be reliable rather than; 'alright, let's give them a chance'.

"The business has changed as much as anything. It is getting harder for younger managers.

"I don’t think it's just about British. But I think it's tougher to be a British manager at the top level because the demands are so high so they (owners) go with who they think give you more a guaranteed view of it."

Sam Allardyce looks on from the stand during the Premier League match between Everton and West Ham United at Goodison Park on November 29, 2017 in Liverpool, England.Sam Allardyce looks on from the stand during the Premier League match between Everton and West Ham United.

However, when looking at the managerial appointments that have been made during the 2017/18 season alone, it seems it is the experienced British bosses as opposed to foreign imports that are mostly blocking the way for the likes of Dyche and Howe.

Of the five coaches hired since the start of the new campaign, only one is non-British in Claude Puel at Leicester City. The rest are Roy Hodgson at Crystal Palace, David Moyes at West Ham United, Alan Pardew at West Bromwich Albion and soon to be Sam Allardyce at Everton.

They are all British and have an average age of over 60-years-old, with Moyes the youngest of the quartet at 54. Not one of them has won a major trophy in English football, with Hodgson the most successful having lifted the league title in Sweden and Denmark.

If Dyche wants to point the finger at anyone for stopping the development of coaches in England it should be the established figures who are coming into clubs for short stints and high wages with the one task of avoiding relegation.

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