How do these 7 European countries feel about Brexit and the EU?

Angela Merkel Looks To Side

The latest YouGov Eurotrack Survey sheds some light on how these key countries view Brexit and the European Union.

The recently released survey was conducted near the end of August and asked respondents from the UK, Germany, France, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway for their views on crucial EU-related issues.

When asked how they would vote on an in/out referendum in their own country, a majority of voters in Germany, France, Denmark, Sweden and Finland said they would vote to remain. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Merkel’s Germany and Denmark were found the be the strongest supporters of their respective countries remaining in the European Union (63% and 61% respectively). A plurality of British respondents said they would vote to stay (44%) – just ahead of the four in ten who said they would vote for Brexit once more.

Emmanuel Macron & Merkel European Council meeting

The only country to reject EU membership outright was Norway (68% - 17%), which is not currently a member of the union.

Furthermore, Germany and Denmark were the only two countries in which a plurality of voters said they were optimistic than pessimistic about the EU’s future.

Another question respondents were asked regarded the EU’s top priorities during the Brexit negotiations (respondents could pick up to three options). The top option picked in both Germany (48%) and France (40%) was that they thought the EU’s top priority was that the UK should pay the EU what it owes when it leaves. The top option picked by Danish (54%), Swedish (46%) and Finnish (39%) respondents was that the two parties should continue to cooperate on the issues of security and counter-terrorism.

UK respondents were also asked to pick the top three issues they though the British government should prioritise in Brexit talks. The top option - picked by 41% - was tariff free trade, followed by cooperation on anti-terrorism efforts and security.

David Davis Headshot

There are fewer than 500 days until Brexit and very little has actually been worked out.

Clearly different negotiating teams and different sets of electorates have different sets of priorities, but all sides should know this: time is running out.

The full results of the poll can be viewed here.