3 things Gordon Brown's new book tell us about Iraq

With explosive claims and allegations, Brown's new book, 'My Life, Our Times' opens the lid on one of the most hotly debated political issues of the day.

Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown has lifted the lid on his feelings around the 2003 Iraq War in his new book, 'My Life, Our Times,' and the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the time does not hold back.

Here are three important points to take from the book:

The US misled the UK

Brown slams the Pentagon in shocking allegations, arguing that the Pentagon and the US Defence Department knew Iraq wasn't harbouring nuclear weapons, but kept Blair's government in the dark in order to give their mission some credibility, and ensure they kept a solid ally in their war. Other leading European powers had defied US requests for military aid, and so George Bush needed to ensure British allegiance - Brown claims that, had the Labour government known that Iraq was not harbouring illegal weapons, they wouldn't necessarily have gone into the region. 

Brown believes the war was a mistake

Unlike many leading Labourites of the time, Brown has now admitted that 'invasion cannot be seen as a proportionate response.' This comes after the Chilcot enquiry and with the power of retrospect. In the book, Brown concedes that all peaceful options for disarmament had not yet been exhausted, and quite explicitly regrets his part in the debacle, which has been a nightmare obstacle to achieving peace in Iraq, and in the Middle East.

Brown always planned to remove troops upon taking office

Brown also reveals in his book that he planned to pull troops from Iraq on the moment he became Prime Minister, as Blair's successor, in 2007. In the event, he eventually pulled troops in 2009 - though the United States remained in the area until 2011, some time later. Quoted in the Guardian, he also states in his book that: 'At this time I made another decision: not to use our future departure from Iraq as an occasion to draw a contrast with Tony or score points against him either.'