Walkover Commonwealth Games bid could clear path for West Ham owners to buy London Stadium

An aerial view of the London Stadium and ArcelorMittal Orbit is pictured during a flight over the capital London in a Cessna 172 plane on August 1, 2017.

Birmingham's walkover Commonwealth Games bid could clear the path for West Ham United's owners to buy the London Stadium.

An aerial view of the London Stadium and ArcelorMittal Orbit is pictured during a flight over the capital London in a Cessna 172 plane on August 1, 2017.

Birmingham was the only city to submit a bid to host the 2022 Commonwealth Games before Saturday's deadline, the Commonwealth Games Federation has revealed.

Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, Victoria in Canada and a potential Australian entry had been thought to be possible bidders but none came forward.

And after Birmingham beat Liverpool earlier in September to be Britain's candidate city, it means they should get a walkover to host the event.

Birmingham's bid is based on plans to make a beautifully upgraded Alexander Stadium the new home of UK Athletics, as reported by Birmingham Mail.

David Sullivan, West Ham owner and David Gold, West Ham chairman look on during the Premier League match between Burnley and West Ham United at Turf Moor on May 21, 2017 in Burnley,...

Now Birmingham have all but been confirmed as hosts it could clear the path for West Ham owners David Sullivan and David Gold to buy the stadium outright - something Sullivan's son Dave has admitted is a possibility - and perhaps even redevelop it properly for football.

In an interview with Sport Bible, Sullivan's son Dave remained coy but admitted it could be on the cards.

When asked 'Is your dad looking into the possibility of buying the London Stadium outright in the future?' Sullivan told Sport Bible: "I cannot comment on that, but it is certainly a possibility."

And when pushed on the situation surrounding the controversial "retractable" seating solution he added: "We are always looking for ways to improve the stadium, so if we think it will increase the fans experience then of course it is an option.

Fans arrive at the stadium prior to kickoff during the Premier League match between West Ham United and Tottenham Hotspur at the London Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Stratford, England.

"However, in the immediate future I do not think so because it has already cost a lot of money to install the normal seating.

"I reckon it could happen, but not for a few years."

Having signed a 99-year lease many supporters are disillusioned at the prospect of a long-term future at the ground in it's current state.

The news comes after the remaining 10% stake the Icelandics owned in West Ham was purchased by American billionaire businessman Tripp Smith, as reported by The Evening Standard.

The deal has led to much speculation but the club is yet to comment or make the news official.

Register for HITC Sport - Daily Dispatch