Surely leavers and remainers see the logic of a Brexit transition deal

Former Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond

With so much likely to change between the UK and the EU, a transition deal is a fair and sensible decision.

The BBC recently reported that Philip Hammond has suggested that a Brexit transition deal could last to 2022 – three years after the UK leaves the EU. What’s wrong with that?

The UK has been tangled up with the EU for decades, resulting in multiple, complex layers of laws, agreements and protocols. There is just over a year and half left until the negotiating clock runs out and the UK exits the EU.

A new UK-EU trade deal could even take up to a decade to thrash out, according to Sir Ivan Rogers the UK’s former EU ambassador, as reported by the BBC.

The Telegraph also reported that in October last year, Sir Andrew Cahn, who was once the head of the organisation 'UK Trade and Investment', said that a new deal take could take five years to work out.

Theresa May PM meeting with European Parliament President

On top of that, Germany’s elections in September could have an impact on the deal, depending on the make-up of the next government.

The two-year negotiating period plays to the EU’s advantage so surely it is better to secure a good deal, even if it takes a little bit longer to finalise, than end up with a bad deal for both parties?

Both remainers and Brexiteers must agree with that.