'Star Wars' will likely reach $2bn globally

Obi Wan Kenobi Star Wars

The force is strong with Disney and the new "Star Wars" franchise, and this is only set to flourish, according to one media analyst.

"They (Disney) are going to probably make, at the end of the day, on this first film alone worldwide, just box office in theaters, probably over $2 billion," Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst at Rentrak told CNBC Monday, adding that the "sky's the limit right now" for Disney.

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" has already secured the best box office opening weekend ever domestically, with an estimated $238 million in the U.S.

Including international sales, the movie has generated $517 million so far. In box office history, only two films have grossed over $2 billion: Avatar ($2.8 billion) and Titanic ($2.19 billion).

"They made a great movie, that's what really does it. If the movie was disappointing, it could have backed down the road all of the success of each additional film, because this sets the stage and the tone for how well the movie is going to do, and all successive properties under the 'Star Wars' brand."

"This sets the stage for a great revenue stream for decades to come for Disney," said Dergarabedian, adding that the seventh installment's merchandising and home video sales will only help boost its success.

"This is a cash cow for Disney. They are going to make a big multiple on that $4 billion investment on Lucasfilm. It was money well spent."

In 2012, Disney bought Lucasfilm for some $4.05 billion, with its CEO, Bob Iger telling CNBC at the time that Disney saw Lucasfilm as one of the "most iconic" and successful entertainment brands, and by acquiring Lucasfilm, it would enable Disney to continue George Lucas' great legacy.

On top of that, using Rentrak's in-theater polling service PostTrak, initial data from "The Force Awakens" suggests there's a "big push from male audiences."

However, with the introduction of Daisy Ridley, who plays lead role 'Rey' in the new movie, Rentrak expects more women will see this movie over time and therefore future films in the saga.

Disney however, has experienced some obstacles in 2015.

In August, Disney revealed that sports network ESPN, had experienced some modest subscriber losses, as consumer taste shifts to digital platforms.

Despite this, Dergarabedian remains confident that Disney's successful film properties—Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm—will help bolster Disney's bottom line.

"You've got a lot of big movies on the way for Disney in general," said Dergarabedian, giving "Finding Dory" and "Captain America: Civil War" as examples. He added that these will "bolster their entire bottom line."

"For Disney this just solidifies their brand and their smart business acumen in terms of making these acquisitions, and shepherding these great movies and properties to the big screen and then to the small screen as well."

By CNBC's Alexandra Gibbs, follow her @AlexGibbsy and @CNBCi