If we fail to tax sugary drinks, we fail our poorest children

fizzy drinks

There’s no single way to tackle childhood obesity, but the problem is urgent, especially among disadvantaged children. A 20% tax would be a big help

There is a single fact that demonstrates the compelling case for bold and brave action on childhood obesity. A quarter of the most disadvantaged children in England are now obese by the time they leave primary school. This is double the rate among the most advantaged children, setting out in stark terms the scale of the health inequality from obesity – and that has profound implications for children’s health and wellbeing, both now and in the future.

Obese children are at greater risk of bullying and of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer and joint problems later in life. The cost to the NHS of obesity is estimated to be £5.1bn annually, and treating diabetes accounts for about 10% of its entire budget. Prevention is a central theme of the NHS’s own long-term plan, yet there has been a further cut in the resources for public health under the November spending review. This places an even greater responsibility on the prime minister to make sure the policies in his obesity strategy can make a lasting difference to children’s wellbeing and life chances. This cannot be stuck in the “too difficult” box just because effective action requires politically difficult decisions.

There is no individual course of action that will solve this epidemic; the scale and consequences of childhood obesity demand bold and brave action in as many areas as possible.

In our report published today, the Common’s health committee urges David Cameron to include a 20% tax on sugary drinks. We do not believe that this is an attack on low-income families, as industry lobbyists will no doubt claim, but rather an essential part of trying to reverse the harm caused by these products. That harm is not confined to obesity; we know for example that dental decay is the commonest reason for hospital admission in children between the ages of five and nine.

While not the only source of dietary sugar, sugar-sweetened drinks account for around a third of intake in four to 18 year-olds. A levy on these products need not hit the pockets of low-income families as there would always be an alternative, untaxed and cheaper equivalent. One of the main purposes of a sugary drinks tax would be to encourage healthier choices, and that has clearly been the effect in countries such as Mexico.

There is also a compelling case for any revenue raised to be used entirely to support children’s health, and to be especially directed to the most disadvantaged schools and communities. A sugary drinks tax would also have the advantage that it could be introduced quickly – and given the scale of the problem, there is no time to lose.

A successful strategy must include education and increasing physical activity but it would be a huge mistake to imagine that obesity can be tackled wholly by this approach. There needs to be an unequivocal message that exercise is enormously beneficial for children and adults alike, whatever their weight. When it comes to preventing obesity, however, no policy will be effective without tackling our food environment.

To be effective, the strategy has to get to grips with the saturation marketing and promotion of junk food and drink. Price promotions have reached record level, with some 40% of our spending on products consumed at home now coming from these apparent deals. The evidence is that they do not save us money, just encourage us to spend more on unhealthy food and drink, where the bulk of promotions are targeted. Who benefits from junk food promotions at the point of sale alongside non-food items or the chicanes of junk alongside checkout queues?

Reformulation has reduced the amount of salt in processed foods, and its time to ask industry to do the same for sugar – and to go further in “downsizing” rather than “supersizing” standard portions. While voluntary agreements have some advantages, industry will need a level playing field with regulation if that does not succeed.

Education messages are dwarfed by the power and persuasion of junk food and drink advertising. Our children are not protected by regulations as they stand, and these must be extended to include internet advertising, especially through so-called “advergames”. It is also time to end the TV advertising of unhealthy food and drink before the 9pm watershed and the use of celebrities and cartoon characters to peddle junk food.

No one would add 14 teaspoons of sugar to a cup of tea, so why not make it clear when that is what is hidden in a small bottle of sweetened drink? Information is powerful when it comes to making choices. Finally, our report recommends giving our local authorities the power to put health at the heart of their planning decisions, be that the design of active communities and safer travel, or the density of fast food outlets near schools. Its time too for a consistent policy for the latter with food standards applying wherever our children are educated.

There are no single or simple answers, but an obesity strategy that is thin on action will condemn another generation of children to a lifetime of obesity.

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article was written by Sarah Wollaston, for theguardian.com on Monday 30th November 2015 09.00 Europe/Londonguardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media Limited 2010