Citigroup courts wealthy heirs

Citi Building Sign

The team went all in on Kate Moss.

Bloomberg News reports that one evening last month at Citigroup in downtown Manhattan, a group of 20-somethings spent $95,000 in a bidding war for a black-and white photo tapestry of the fashion model’s face. They were confident that the work by the prominent New York artist Chuck Close was worth the price.

That’s why there was a collective gasp when Tash Perrin, a senior vice president at Christie’s, revealed that the work didn’t sell when it was last auctioned in 2013.

The sale and money that the 40 participants used to bid with was fake, but the lesson on valuing and buying art was real. The attendees, from wealthy families in 18 countries, are poised to inherit enough money in coming years to purchase some of the items they were shown at the event - from Cartier earrings worn by Elizabeth Taylor to a Bjork album cover photograph. For firms like Citi Private Bank, teaching them how to invest in art is one tool to help retain the heirs when the family wealth is passed on to them.

To access the complete Bloomberg News article hit the link below:

How Citigroup Courts Wealthy Young Heirs: Teach Them to Buy Art

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