Labour's London Mayoral candidates announced

David Lammy MP

Labour has released the names of the six candidates set to battle it out for the Labour Mayoral candidacy. Who's standing for the position?

According to the BBC, the six candidates vying to stand against other parties as Labour’s representative are MPs Tessa Jowell, David Lammy, Sadiq Khan, Diane Abbot and Gareth Tomas. The journalist Christian Wolmar is also standing to be Labour’s candidate.

Former London Mayor and candidate in 2012, Ken Livingston, is not standing for the position.

In 2012, Boris Johnson won a second term against Mr Livingston. The Green party’s candidate came third.

The next election will be held in 2016 and Boris Johnson will likely not be standing again as he is now an MP, having won his seat in the general election earlier this year.

Labour's candidate

Who have the bookmakers got as the favourite?

William Hill puts Tessa Jowell as the front-runner on 6/5, ahead of Sadiq Khan on 15/8 and David Lammy on 6/1. Diane Abbot’s odds are 14/1, whilst Gareth Thomas’ are 25/1 and Christian Wolmar’s are 33/1.

The winning Labour candidate will go onto face the Conservative candidate next May. The London Assembly will also be voted for at the same time.

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The Conservatives' candidate

William Hill gives odds of 1/3 for Zac Goldsmith being the Conservative candidate in the Mayoral election, making him the clear favourite. Syed’s Kemall’s odds are 11/2 and Nick de Bois’ are 8/1.

Election

In good news for Labour, William Hill puts Labour in with a better chance of winning the Mayoral elections than the Conservatives: Labour 4/11. Conservatives 9/4.

However, a lot will depend on which candidates are chosen to stand for their respective parties.

The chances of another party winning the Mayoral election are slim, with William Hill giving the odds for a Lib Dem victory as 50/1 and an ‘other’ victory’ as 14/1.

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