Voters would favour a coalition over a minority government

Big Ben, Westminster

A new YouGov poll for the Sunday Times indicates that a coalition deal would be preferred to a minority government.

Overall, the poll gave the following results for voting intentions:

Labour 36%. Conservatives 33%. Liberal Democrats 8%. UKIP 13%. Greens 5%.

Respondents were asked the following question:

"If there is a hung Parliament after the next election with no one party having a majority of the seats, which of the following would you rather see?"

  • 44% said they would prefer a formal coalition deal, up four points from March.
  • 30% said they would prefer a minority government that deals with other parties on an issue by issue basis, down three points from March.

Furthermore, when respondents were asked if they preferred a stable, formal deal for five years or a minority government with another election later in the year, 46% said the former, whilst 30% said the latter, suggesting little demand for another election in 2015.

Whilst it appears that the British public would prefer a formal coalition deal to a minority government, the poll also suggested that voters would prefer single party government to coalition government or a formal deal between numerous parties.

  • 29% said they would prefer a coalition government.
  • 49% said they would prefer a single party government.

However, since March the gap has narrowed. In March 22% said they would prefer a coalition, whilst 57% said they would prefer a single party government, suggesting that voters have become more aware and accepting of the idea of multi-party government as another hung parliament looms.

Overall, it appears that stability is important to British voters with the plurality of respondents saying they would rather have a coalition than a minority government or another quick election, however, single party government would be the preferred option.

With 18 days to go single party government looks unlikely, but whether or not there will be another coalition is yet to be seen.

See the full results of the Sunday Times poll here. 1,780 GB adults were questioned between the 17th and 18th April.


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