Poll suggests public back Labour’s taxation policies

Ed Miliband

A new YouGov poll for the Sunday Times suggests that a majority of people are in favour of some key Labour policies.

Overall, the poll (conducted between the 10th and 11th April) gave the following results for Westminster voting intentions in the election in just over three weeks time.

Conservatives 34%. Labour 34%. Liberal Democrats 7%. UKIP 13%. Greens 6%. SNP/PCY 5%.

The poll also asked some questions about a few of Labour’s taxation policies and found a majority in favour of introducing a new tax on houses over £2m, raising the top rate of tax from 45p in the pound to 50p in the pound, and abolishing the “non’dom” tax rule, which has been in the headlines recently.

A total of 64% of respondents said they would support introducing a new tax on houses worth over £2 million, whilst 23% said they would oppose this. A majority of people intending to vote Labour (84%), Lib Dem (67%) and UKIP (62%) said would support the policy, whilst Conservative voters were split with 42% saying they would support it compared to 45% against.

Furthermore, 64% of respondents said they would also favour raising the top rate of income tax from 45p to 50p, as proposed by Labour. Again the polls suggest that a majority of Labour, Lib Dem and UKIP voters would favour this, whilst Conservative voters were found to be against it (48%-41%).

As for the issue of abolishing non-doms, something which Labour proposed only recently, 50% of respondents said they would favour this, against the 25% who would be opposed to abolishing the status. Once again a majority of Labour, Lib Dem and UKIP voters would favour the abolishment, whilst Conservatives would oppose it (48%-28%).

This is just one poll but it gives an indication that some of Labour’s key taxation policies are catching on and not just amongst their core base: the party's policies are attracting support from across the British political spectrum.

With the two main parties neck and neck this polling can only be good news for Labour, but with three weeks to go it will be hard to tell if this helps.

The full results of the poll can be found here. 1,887 GB adults were interviewed between the 10th and 11th of April.

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