One lesson Spurs fans hope Daniel Levy has learned this season

Daniel Levy

The emergence of several academy stars over the last 18 months could see Tottenham change tact with their approach to buying, and selling players.

The mixed transfer fortunes of Spurs over the last couple of years may well have proved something to the club's renowned business-orientated supremo Daniel Levy.

Having struggled to replace the likes of Luka Modric and Gareth Bale after big money moves to Real Madrid, the performances of academy star Harry Kane once again mean Spurs have one of the top stars of the Premier League on their books.

Previously, it has seemed as if Levy championed the idea that anyone is replaceable if ample compensation is paid.

The absolute nightmare for Tottenham fans will be if Kane's astonishing end of season form pulls in a crazy bid from one Europe's financial superpowers.

Considering that the 21-year-old is one of Europe's top goalscorers right now, and very much the youngest among them, it wouldn't be much of a surprise if Real Madrid or Manchester United, both clubs on the lookout for attacking reinforcements who have demonstrated that they are prepared to overpay to get their man, come knocking at Daniel Levy's door with firm interest and an open chequebook.

Of course, given Kane's relationship with Spurs and their supporters, as a self-proclaimed fan himself, it is more than likely that the Englishman will be eager to remain at White Hart Lane for as long as possible.

But what many hope Levy has learned from the record sale of Bale, and the subsequent expensive recruitment drive, is that it is not easy switch to replace such a mainstay of the side with someone that on paper looks a strong alternative.

Erik Lamela, Bale's obvious replacement, has after two seasons failed to show anything like the Welshman's form. At 23, he may yet get another season, but Kane's emergence is all the more remarkable given how much Spurs needed a forward, and how difficult, and not to mention expensive, it is to acquire someone that is capable of scoring 20-30 goals a season. Tottenham paid £26 million - per the BBC - to try and achieve that with Roberto Soldado, another signing that has hugely backfired.

With the likes of Paulinho, Etienne Capoue, and even to an extent Benjamin Stamouli, all failing to win consistent first-team spots because of the performances of home-grown talent, manager Mauricio Pochettino should be eager to convince his chairman that the squad has a strong base forged in North London. To even consider trading the likes of Kane out from the side, for whatever is offered, would truly be selling the heart of the club, and there is no guarantee they could ever bring in someone to replace that, however many tens of millions they would spend.

Instead, the Argentine should be imploring Levy to cut their losses on the imports that have failed to shine, and instead build a young side with academy graduates at its heart, with a few sprinkles of outstanding talent. By doing so there will be a loyalty and identity, two things money can't buy, that could be the foundation, and the making of Tottenham.

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