It was a big day for hacking, social blunders

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Social media hacks and blunders hit a number of prominent individuals and organizations on Tuesday.

When Twitter CFO Anthony Noto's account reeled off 269 apparently spam-filled tweets in an eight-minute span on Tuesday afternoon, it capped an active day for social media hacks and blunders for prominent organizations and individuals.

Read More Twitter CFO's account hacked

In the morning, Newsweek's account was compromised by the CyberCaliphate, a group that claims affiliation with ISIS. Tweets, which included assertions of leaked military information and threats toward first lady Michelle Obama, were removed within 20 minutes of their posting.

Delta Air Lines responded less rapidly to a breach of its Facebook page in the afternoon. Posts accompanied by lewd photos appeared on Delta's feed between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. ET on Tuesday, and the first photo wasn't removed for about an hour.

Read More Hackers breach Delta Air Lines Facebook

No group has clearly claimed responsibility for the hack, and Delta has yet to identify anyone behind the posts.

Additionally, reports surfaced on Tuesday afternoon that hackers infiltrated Forbes' financial news site in November to gather information from readers. Two cybersecurity firms have said Chinese hackers were behind the attack, Reuters reported.

Read More Hackers spied on Forbes readers in November attack

Meanwhile, the Verge reported that Jeb Bush had published hundreds of thousands of emails from his time as Florida governor in the name of transparency. But Bush didn't redact information from emails-some of which included confidential medical or employment information.

Also on Tuesday, a U.S. federal government agency took some servers offline while responding to a suspected breach, cybersecurity site Krebsonsecurity.com reported. The Defense Contract Management Agency, which administers contracts for the Department of Defense, is investigating suspicious activity on a server, the report says.

The flurry of blunders came on Safer Internet Day, which the European Union's Insafe network organizes to promote responsible Internet use.