Apple heads to trial with Steve Jobs as a witness

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates

What's at stake for Apple as it fights a class action lawsuit that claims it engaged in anticompetitive practices.

Apple's early iPod days are being revisited in court Tuesday in a trial that will hear from Steve Jobs three years after his death.

Apple is accused of participating in antitrust behavior. About 10 years ago, iPods only played songs sold off of iTunes or downloaded from CDs, it wouldn't allow consumers to buy music from less expensive stores.

Plaintiffs in the federal trial in Oakland, California, are seeking about $350 million in damages. If the plaintiffs prevail, the final damages could be triple, exceeding $1 billion, under U.S. antitrust law.

In a video deposition taped a few months before his death, Jobs discussed the music deals Apple had in place. Several emails from Jobs are also expected to be entered into evidence. Apple software chief Eddy Cue and marketing senior vice president Philip Schiller are also expected to testify.

Apple didn't immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment.