Aston Villa owner Randy Lerner's decision making deserves scrutiny

Elland Road Revie Stand

Aston Villa's Randy Lerner may have made a more costly mistake than Leeds United's Massimo Cellino - despite not facing as much criticism in the media.

Massimo Cellino's decision to sack Darko Milanic as Leeds United manager is one which has been heavily criticised this week.

Leeds parted with Milanic after only giving him 32 days in-charge of the club and they are now on their third manager of the season, with Neil Redfearn expected to officially be announced as boss soon.

It is a trigger-happy approach which has seen Cellino criticised and questions asked whether he is the right man to take Leeds forward.

However, directly contrasting this revolving door policy which seems to be in place at Elland Road, Randy Lerner's management style at Aston Villa deserves just as much chastising. 

Lerner handed Paul Lambert a new long-term contract after one good run of form at the start of the season and he is now stuck with the Scot, regardless of how this campaign goes. 

Unless Lerner is prepared to shell out a huge amount of compensation to Lambert, Villa cannot part with a manager who appears to be taking them backwards because of their insistence that stability was needed at the club. 

Villa started the season in fine form, but since handing Lambert a contract the Claret and Blue have lost their last five games, without scoring a goal, and they are dropping down the Premier League table at an alarming rate. 

They have no choice but to keep the faith in Lambert now and the reactionary decision that Lerner made earlier in the season looks far more costly than any that Cellino has made in his time at Leeds. 

Indeed, the manager who the Italian owner at Elland Road has just appointed took 10 points out of 12 during his time as caretaker early on in the campaign and if Redfearn can pick up where he left off then it would not be beyond the realms of possibility that a promotion push could be made. 

It is true that patience can be a good thing for football clubs to have, but stability for the sake of it can also be just as damaging as regularly changing managers and Lerner should be facing at least as much criticism as Cellino has in the press this week for his misplaced faith. 

Register for HITC Sport - Daily Dispatch