New interactive quiz puts motorists and cyclists through their paces

Bicycle Close Up

The Great British Cycling Quiz will test your knowledge of UK roads and cycling safety.

The quiz, which can be accessed via this link, was set up by Irwin Mitchell, a 102-year-old solicitor firm from the United Kingdom. It aims to raise awareness amongst motorists and cyclists of the importance of safety around cycling on UK roads.

Being solicitors Irwin Mitchell know all to well how much of an impact road accidents can have on the lives of cyclists and their families. 

Cycling in and around London has become a top issue after it emerged that 14 cyclists were killed in accidents in the capital last year, with six of those coming in a 2-week period in November.

With this fun and interactive quiz Irwin Mitchell wants to refresh the knowledge of all motorists, not only cyclists, with regard to cycling around the UK's busiest roads.

The quiz consists of eight handpicked questions using traffic regulations and the Highway Code. You will be told after each question whether or not you have answered correctly. Then at the end your percentage will be calculated and you'll find out just how much you really know about cycling safety.

You can also share your scores on social networking platforms Facebook and Twitter to see how you stack up against friends and family.

Neil Whiteley, Partner and head of the specialist serious injury team at Irwin Mitchell, said: "It is important to be aware of the rules for safe cycling to reduce the risk of accidents, and even more important for other road users especially motorists and lorry drivers to have a better understanding of what issues cyclists face and what they should and should not do on the road.

"Hopefully our quiz will highlight some issues and encourage people to think a bit more about the roads we ride and drive on. Cyclists and motorists alike have a lot to consider when they're on their travels, and we think our quiz questions will surprise both participants and those reading our future findings."