Sir Trevor Brooking to stand down from FA role and retire

Three Lions close

Former England midfielder Trevor Brooking will retire from his role as the Football Association's director of football development after the World Cup.

Brooking - who was made a knight of the realm for his services to the sport in 2003 - has held the role for just over ten years but will now bow out of football and seek retirement at the age of 65. 

Brooking has been at the forefront of campaigns pushing for England to adopt a more attacking and technical identity as a nation, and has often spoken passionately about vastly improving junior coaching.

The former West Ham star was also pivotal in the development of St George's park which was opened in 2012. 

England manager Roy Hodgson lead tributes following the news labelling Brooking a "football man" and citing his great friendship with his fellow veteran on and off the field during his time in charge of England. 

Hodgson went on to say: “He was a fine footballer, one that any England team would be grateful of, and he has proved to be equally adept in his role at the FA.”

Brooking leaves behind him a huge footballing legacy.

The two-time FA cup winner made 47 appearances for England between 1974 and 1982 and is regarded as the 'greatest manager West Ham never had', eventually having a stand at Upton Park named in his honour in 2009.

Brooking will be suceeded by Dan Ashworth, Gareth Southgate and Mark Sampson who have been chosen to continue the FA's football development vision. 

 

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