Easter Egg-Stravaganza!

Easter Background 1 Renate Kalloch

With the long Easter weekend coming up, it’s time to have a look at a food that's been around for centuries and has been getting a bad rap for quite some time. I'm talking eggs, and - sorry - not the ones made out of chocolate.

I think it’s time to focus on the eggs-ellent health benefits of eggs. I might even consider calling them a superfood.

What's not to like about eggs? They're cheap, they're easy to dish up in lots of different ways (I tend to snack on boiled eggs, which irritates my colleagues), they have a high nutritional value, are high in protein, iron, minerals and vitamins. Nowadays you can even get them high in Omega 3, where the chickens tend to have a better diet than lots of us, being fed flaxseed, marine algae, and fish oil. They are also just delicious.

But aren't they high in cholesterol, I hear you say? There are actually studies that show no difference in heart disease risk between one control group eating one egg a week and the other group eating more than that. So I'd be happy for everyone to eat one egg a day*, and remember, egg whites don't have any cholesterol, so you can make your scrambled eggs even higher in protein by adding the egg white of another 1 -2 eggs.

Now, if you can't resist the chocolate Easter eggs you found on your Easter egg hunt, it might be a good idea to swap your hot cross bun or bagel breakfast to a br-egg-fast (isn't that clever?). Eggs increase a sense of fullness and are more satisfying than a bagel breakfast, according to a study reported in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Think diet – think eggs for br-egg-fast!

I’m all for eggs, and with the weather forecast for the weekend, you can even use your boiled eggs for the egg and spoon race in the park before having your picnic and Easter egg hunt.

Just make sure you cook your eggs thoroughly to avoid any contamination.

Happy Easter!

 

*Those with heart disease, diabetes, or a high level of LDL 'bad' cholesterol should probably choose a small or medium egg vs. larger ones, which have more cholesterol. And remember that egg whites have no cholesterol.